The Difference: Dallas Mavericks 101, Houston Rockets 91

Posted by Rob Mahoney on November 29, 2010 under Recaps | Be the First to Comment

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You know the drill. The Difference is a quick-hitting reflection on the game that was, with one bullet for every point in the final margin.

Box ScorePlay-By-PlayShot Chart — GameFlow

  • No back-handed compliments and no caveats: Caron Butler (19 points, 8-16 FG, zero turnovers) played well. Particularly, Butler did a terrific job of cutting and rotating in the half-court offense rather than parking on the wing and waiting for the ball. Such movement not only enables Butler to make a catch in transit on the way to the rim, but it also frees him up to take his favorite mid-range jumpers in a far more palatable setting. Butler is fine as a catch-and-shoot player, or in taking one dribble to step in for a shot. The trouble comes when Caron tries to create off the dribble in isolation, and by moving prior to receiving the ball, Butler is protecting himself from…well, himself.
  • Again, love the adjustments as the game went on. Houston was hitting threes and crashing the offensive boards in the first half, but both of those factors were ultimately rectified by the ebb of the Rockets’ shooting and a stronger presence on the defensive glass by the Mavs in the second half.
  • J.J. Barea (11 points, six assists, three rebounds) has looked fantastic driving to the bucket over the last few games, and he’s really using a combination of hesitation moves and patience to his advantage. By displaying a bit more discretion in both his shooting and playmaking, Barea makes the threat of his hesitation that much more potent, which of course further enables him to explode off the dribble and catch opponents off-guard.
  • Houston’s defense on Dirk Nowitzki (20 points, 10-16 FG, 10 rebounds, three turnovers, three blocks) ranged from excellent but futile (Luis Scola) to just plain misguided (Jordan Hill). Something tells me that letting Dirk face up and rise from mid-range without any kind of contest isn’t the way to curtail his scoring production.
  • The first quarter saw 10 of the game’s 17 lead changes. Houston led by as many as three, while Dallas was up by as many as four.
  • A tremendous showing for Shawn Marion (14 points, 5-10 FG, 10 rebounds), who is on one of those rolls, only different from all of his previous rolls. Capiche?
  • Luis Scola is pivotal to the Rockets’ Yao-less offense, and Rick Carlisle elected to have the Mavs swarm Scola during the third quarter. Jason Kidd often released for the double team off of Kyle Lowry, a wise decision given Lowry’s limitations as a spot-up shooter. It’s no coincidence that Dallas really started to separate in the third.
  • Six points, nine rebounds, and two blocks for Brendan Haywood, which is firmly in Erick Dampier territory. Still, Haywood looked more active on the glass than he has of late, and though that alone won’t make the Mavs’ brass sleep more soundly at night with Haywood’s massive contract tucked under their pillows, it’s a nice surprise for a night. That’s how far Haywood has fallen; six, nine, and two now qualifies as a pleasant surprise.
  • The Rockets were able to burn the Mavs pretty consistently with backdoor cuts, which should hardly come as any surprise given that Rick Adelman orchestrated Houston’s offense from the sideline. Zone defenses are particulary vulnerable to such cuts, but Dallas didn’t seem to be much more attentive or responsive to the open backdoor when in man-to-man sets, either.
  • The Mavs ultimately gave up a run to make this game seem closer than it was, but it wasn’t your typical late-game lead concession. This one was very much decided when Houston made their final push toward a respectable margin, and while that dings up the Mavs’ final point differential, it’s not in the vein of Dallas’ previous late-game let-ups.

Heard It Through the Pre-Draft Grapevine

Posted by Rob Mahoney on June 20, 2009 under xOther | Read the First Comment

General

  • Yahoo’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that the Blazers have legitimate interest in Jason Kidd.  Boot up the trade machine!
  • Nick Prevenas of NBADraft.net: “The 2009 draft frequently draws comparisons to the 2000 draft — otherwise known as the worst draft in NBA history. Kenyon Martin (a player eerily similar to Griffin) went No. 1 overall, but never developed into the dominant power forward we expected to see after his career at Cincinnati was stopped short by a broken leg. He turned into a key cog in the Denver Nuggets’ run to the Western Conference Finals, but injuries have held back a potentially promising career. The rest of that draft was just dreadful. Marcus Fizer? Keyon Dooling? Jerome Moiso? Courtney Alexander? Lottery picks. Seriously…Is this year’s draft that bad? At this point, I’m leaning no. However, it is the type of draft where a team would much rather pick in the 15-25 range than from 4-13…[Jrue] Holiday — along with guys like Tyreke Evans, DeMar DeRozan, Stephen Curry, Jordan Hill, Jeff Teague, and so on — are seeing their stock artificially inflated because of the lack of competition.”
  • Matt Kamalsky of Draft Express breaks down the shooting guards in the draft (notably Marcus Thornton, Terrence Williams, Jeff Teague) by the numbers.
  • John Hollinger’s Draft Rater is very high on Ty Lawson, Austin Daye, and Nick Calathes, three prospects which have been linked to the Mavs via rumors or simply availability.  The three came in as the 1st, 4th, and 6th best collegiate prospects respectively, outclassing plenty of their lottery-bound draftmates.  Jordan Hill and Patty Mills are listed as potential disappointments.  Hollinger willingly admits that the Rater has missed the boat entirely on some prospects, so keep in mind that prospect hunting is hardly a science.

Ty Lawson

  • The Nets’ GM, Kiki Vandeweghe, gave a glowing review of Lawson following his workout in Jersey: “To me, it’s more of what the guy has inside. It’s more about speed, quickness…At the end of the day, that’s what basketball is. Would you like to have taller players on your team? Yeah, it’s basketball…But having said that, this guy I think is one of the more ready guys to play. If he comes in, he helps a team, no question about it…First of all, he’s very strong…If you look at the history, he makes other players better, knows how to play. If you go back through the history of our league, guys who were very strong that way — no matter what size they are — they find a way to compete at their position. I think he really helps a team.”
  • Dave Berri also makes the case for Lawson.  That’s not one, but two of the most prominent stat heads in the field on Lawson’s side.  Ty also has all of the “heart of a champion” rhetoric and anecdotal evidence he could possibly need.  Considering that all that really seems to stand between Lawson and a guaranteed spot in the lottery are his measurables, can the Mavs really expect him to tumble to 22?

Jordan Hill

  • The Knicks may have some interest in Hill at 8, so if the Mavs are content with moving up in the draft to snag him, they’d best play it safe and aim for Washington’s 5th pick.  Then again, maybe they shouldn’t be doing that at all for the likes of Jordan Hill.  And then again, maybe Hill has convinced the Wizards to stick around in the lottery.

Jeff Teague

  • Michael Stephenson, in a guest post for TrueHoop: “Teague had the purest stroke and hit his jumper most consistently in the drills and during the scrimmage…But it was obvious that he’s a level behind and had trouble keeping up with his peers. In an extremely guard heavy draft, I imagine it’s going to be tough for him to turn many heads.”  The peers that Stephenson describes are Jonny Flynn, Brandon Jennings, Ty Lawson, Jrue Holiday, and Tyreke Evans.
  • John Givony, of DraftExpress fame, wrote a feature on point guards for NBA.com.  Conveniently absent from Givony’s superlatives is Jeff Teague, and there’s a reason for that: Teague is not, and likely will never be, a conventional point guard.  Asking Teague to run the show is akin to asking a young Jason Terry of the same

Terrence Williams


via Detroit Bad Boys via Dime

  • The Mavs certainly have competition for the services of Terrence Williams.  The Nets seem awfully high on him, and the Bobcats would not only make sense (Williams seems like a Larry Brown kinda guy), but be entirely possible with the 12th pick.
  • Williams knows how to win over the hearts and minds of NBA coaches, teammates, and die-hards: defense.  It’s what separates him from the rest of the talent pool the Mavs may face with the 22 pick, and Williams has the size, the resolve, and the athleticism to be a fantastic defender in the big leagues.

When Taking a Shot in the Dark, Aim Up

Posted by Rob Mahoney on June 15, 2009 under Commentary | 4 Comments to Read

The Mavs have been linked to the Wizards and their number 5 pick in the draft for sometime now, with Jordan Hill’s name making the rounds.  Most indications point to Hill being a solid basketball player, but he’s hardly bound for stardom; Hill’s strengths are matched by sizeable limitations, indicators that Hill may be a contributor on the next level but won’t sniff the glory his price tag suggests.  If the Mavs can snag Hill for a combination of expiring deals, that’s spectacular.  But with Washington poised to make a run at the playoffs with a healthy Gilbert Arenas and Brendan Haywood, how does that even seem like a remote possibility?  Dumping the contracts of a player like Etan Thomas may seem like an attractive possibility, but does a pure salary dump really make any sense with the Wiz over the cap for the foreseeable future and almost certainly above the luxury tax line?

Don’t get me wrong, I understand the incentive from a financial perspective.  For Abe Polin and the Wiz’s ownership, saving a dollar is saving a dollar.  But does it really make sense to sell out the 5th pick for only the slightest of profit margins?  Unless Josh Howard or Jason Terry are involved, a swap for the no. 5 just doesn’t seem to make much sense at all for Washington.

Beyond that, what sense does it even make for the Mavs?  Hill will be able to play immediately, but he can’t be expected to be an especially effective starter.  Playing alongside Dirk Nowitzki, Jason Kidd, Josh Howard, and Jason Terry would seem beneficial to any rookie, but we still can’t expect Hill to make a tremendous amount of noise during his rookie campaign.  Maybe the thought process is that he doesn’t have to for the Mavs to be successful.  I wouldn’t be too sure.  If the Mavs move either Terry or Howard for Hill, it’s certainly a step down.  If they move Erick Dampier for Hill, it’s likely a lateral move for the first year at best.  The only exception would be a salary dump deal centered around Jerry Stackhouse, but that seems like an impossibility given the value of such a high pick (even in an off year).  Jordan Hill isn’t the type of talent that’s worth setting the team back, especially during the later stages of Dirk, Kidd, and JET’s careers.  He’s likely not going to turn into an otherworldly force that could justify that commitment and that sacrifice, and trading members of the current core for him would be a pretty big mistake.

All that said, what if Hill really isn’t the apple of the Mavs’ eye?  What if, in a bit of pre-draft shenanigans, the Mavs are insistent upon raising a Jordan Hill smokescreen?

Blake Griffin will be off the board, and Ricky Rubio and Hasheem Thabeet could likely be as well.  The Kings have been linked to Rubio, Jrue Holiday, Tyreke Evans, Brandon Jennings, Jonny Flynn, and Alf.  So who exactly may be left at 5?  Better players than Jordan Hill, that’s for damn sure.

Personally, I’d like the Mavs (supposing a trade up in the draft can actually be had) to take one of two players.

Photo by Harry How/Getty Images.

The first is James Harden.  Harden is essentially what the Mavs crave in a shooting guard, but he’s way out of their league pick-wise.  Harden’s a surefire top 5 pick in my eyes, combining a tenacious ability to score from long-range or around the basket with tough, physical defense and good size (6’5”, almost a 6’11” wingspan).  He’s as close to NBA-ready as any prospect in the draft, especially those on the wings, and in my opinion he’d have a seamless plug-in into the starting lineup alongside Kidd and Josh Howard.  He’s not lightning fast and he’s not oversized, but Harden’s style offensively and defensively and his size would make him an ideal candidate for a franchise 2-guard to succeed Terry.

Photo from BrandonJennings.net.

The second, and to me the more intriguing, is Brandon Jennings.  It’s dubious as to whether or not Jennings will even be available at 5 (although the same is true of Harden, who has been linked to the Thunder and even the Grizzlies), but Jennings being gone at 4 means that one of the other top prospects (Rubio, Thabeet, Harden…not Griffin) would have to fall to the 5 spot.  Good news, meet good news.

Jennings is a real deal, fast as hell point guard.  He’s confident, he’s skilled, and he once rocked the high top fade.  He’s bold (even brash) and clearly a willing risk-taker.  Jennings could be exactly the type of athlete that could usher in a new era of Mavs’ success, and I’m not alone in thinking he’ll be something truly special.  He’s got the bravado and the skills to bring some serious star power to the franchise, and it’s time the Mavs start planning for life after Kidd.  Whether or not that life begins this summer or in summers to come is up to the Mavs and Jason to decide, but assuming he can’t keep playing forever, a realistic successor needs to be waiting in the wings.  He has the potential to be one of the league’s best point guards, and a playing style that would make him a killer off the bench in the short-term.  Others may see the risk in Jennings, but from the tape I’ve seen of him, he’s a sure thing.  This guy could be absolutely stellar as a NBA point guard, and I can only hope the Mavs can leap up the draft to nab him.

With either Jennings or Harden likely available, the logic behind picking Jordan Hill doesn’t stick.  If you want an instant contribution, Harden is the man.  He’s a cure-all at the 2, bringing the shooting that Antoine Wright lacks, the defense missing from JET’s game, and the size Barea can never fully compensate for.  If you want star power, Jennings has it in spades.  His game is tremendous, he’ll sell jerseys, and he’ll be your point guard for the next decade.  There’s plenty to like in either candidate, and plenty to prefer over Jordan Hill.  Can Hill be productive in the NBA, and, can he even compete at the center position?  The Mavs already have enough of a minutes problem at the 4 with Dirk and Brandon Bass, and if Hill doesn’t pan out as a good enough interior defender (the evidence, but statistical and anecdotal, doesn’t go in his favor), the Mavs are put in quite a pickle.  It’s one thing if Hill is simply a Brandon Bass insurance policy, safeguarding the team from a compensation-less departure from Bass.  But it’s another entirely if the Mavs plan on making Dirk, Bass, and Hill coexist peacefully in the minutes column and on the defensive end.  Why take that chance when there are better prospects available?  Why force Hill to play out of position when a natural 2-guard and the point guard of the future are right at your fingertips?  The answer lies either in a smokescreen or under layers of psychosis in a Mavs front office deluded into false prophecies of Hill’s success alongside Dirk.  Some of that success may be found, but at what cost?

Rumor Mongering: Eye on the Five

Posted by Rob Mahoney on June 2, 2009 under Rumors | 4 Comments to Read

Jonathan Givony of Draft Express:

Another interesting tidbit of information coming out of the NBA Combine in Chicago revolves around the Dallas Mavericks and potential interest they may have in Arizona power forward Jordan Hill. The rumor mill indicates that Dallas is seriously considering making a move to acquire the ultra athletic junior, and views him as exactly the type of tough, active rebounder they are missing in their frontcourt rotation at the moment. Brandon Bass currently fills that role for them, but they may not be able to keep him and still maintain ample cap space for 2010…Hill’s measurements (6-9 ¼ without shoes, 7-1 ½ wingspan, 9-0 standing reach) in Chicago confirmed the notion many people had that he will have no problem seeing minutes at center in today’s NBA…One team that could reportedly help Dallas move up high enough to pick Hill is the Washington Wizards at #5, a team they already have a history with making draft-day deals…Dallas can offer either the non-guaranteed contract of Jerry Stackhouse to help the Wizards reduce payroll next year (while taking someone like Mike James or Etan Thomas off their hands) or they can help the Wizards by providing a veteran like Josh Howard or Jason Terry if it’s experience and scoring punch they are after. Either move would allow the Mavericks to stay flexible from a financial standpoint as they look towards the free agent class of 2010. They can also dangle their first round pick (#22).